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Bicycle lane in Mashhad Our compartment mates for our overnight train from Shiraz to Tehran was this cute old couple, who were returning to Tehran after visiting relatives in Shiraz. They bought us food, fended off annoying people asking us where we were from, and showed us photos from their Instagram profile, to which we could no longer use our usual excuse that we were too old for Instagram... Atiq Jame Mosque, the oldest mosque in Shiraz dating from the 9th century Iwan of the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque because of the extensive use of pink colours in its tiles Iwan of the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque because of the extensive use of pink colours in its tiles Model of an ox-well inside the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque None Inside the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque, with sunlight streaming in through the colourful stained-glass mosaic windows lining the main prayer hall Inside the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque, with sunlight streaming in through the colourful stained-glass mosaic windows lining the main prayer hall. It is one of the most popular sights in Shiraz, and was full of tourists when we were there. Inside the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque because of the extensive use of pink colours in its tiles Inside the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque, with sunlight streaming in through the colourful stained-glass mosaic windows lining the main prayer hall Nasir al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, also popularly known as the Pink Mosque because of the extensive use of pink colours in its tiles In the art gallery in the basement of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz, showcasing how traditional glazed tiles are made In the art gallery in the basement of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz, showcasing how mosaic tiles are made One of the rooms of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz Side porch of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz One of the rooms of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz Colourful stained-glass windows in one of the rooms of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz View of the garden from the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz, lined with date palms and sour orange trees Extensive mirrorwork in one of the rooms of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz View of the garden from the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz The central mirrored porch of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz Intricate ceiling paintings inside one of the rooms of the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz Intricate ceiling paintings inside the Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house in Shiraz Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house and garden in Shiraz, with tilework depicting the "Lion and Sun", the Qajar royal emblem, on the pediment Tilework at the front of the Naranjestan-e Qavam garden in Shiraz, depicting three Qajari figures Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house and garden in Shiraz, lined with date palms and sour orange trees Naranjestan-e Qavam historical house and garden in Shiraz The courtyard of the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. The new prayer hall of the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, located behind the main shrine buildings Inside the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. The interior of the shrine is decorated with extensive mirrorwork. Inside the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. The interior of the shrine is decorated with extensive mirrorwork. The Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. This building is one of the icons of Shiraz. Golden door leading into the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. The fourteen names inscribed in calligraphy on the door are those of Prophet Muhammad, the twelve Shiite Imams, and Fatimah, the daughter of Prophet Muhammad and mother/grandmother/etc of all the Imams. Inside the Shah Cheragh holy shrine in Shiraz, housing the tombs of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of the seventh Shiite Imam and brothers of the eighth Shiite Imam. The interior of the shrine is decorated with extensive mirrorwork. Madrese-e Khan in Shiraz, a religious school dating from the Safavid era Madrese-e Khan in Shiraz, a religious school dating from the Safavid era Entrance to the Vakil Mosque in Shiraz, with exuberant floral decorative tiles dating from the Qajar period Entrance to the Vakil Mosque in Shiraz. Unfortunately, we visited on a Friday and the mosque and surrounding Vakil Bazaar were all closed. In front of the Karim Khan Citadel in Shiraz The Karim Khan Citadel in Shiraz The Karim Khan Citadel in Shiraz, with a wonky tower One more for the desert flower collection None The Triumph Relief of Shapur I, showing the victory of Shapur I over the Roman emperors Valerian and Philip the Arab, below the tomb of Darius I at Naqsh-e Rustam None Inscriptions in Middle Persion on the lower exterior walls of the Ka'ba-ye Zartosht, in the Naqsh-e Rustam compound Ka'ba-ye Zartosht, meaning the Cube of Zoroaster, in the Naqsh-e Rustam compound. Several theories exist regarding the purpose of the structure, but nobody really knows. The structure is a replica of a similar structure (built several decades earlier) in Pasargad. Ka'ba-ye Zartosht, meaning the Cube of Zoroaster, in the Naqsh-e Rustam compound. Several theories exist regarding the purpose of the structure, but nobody really knows. The structure is a replica of a similar structure (built several decades earlier) in Pasargad. None Naqsh-e Rustam, the necropolis of the Achaemenid empire, with four large tombs cut high into the cliff face. The tombs are believed to be those of Achaemenid kings (from left to right) Darius II, Artaxerxes I, Darius I, and Xerxes I. Our campsite between Naqsh-e Rajab and Naqsh-e Rustam, waking up to stormclouds looming in background Rock-cut relief at Naqsh-e Rajab, showing the Investiture of Shapur by Ahuramazda Rock-cut relief at Naqsh-e Rajab, showing the Investiture of Ardashir by Ahuramazda Rock-cut relief at Naqsh-e Rajab, showing Shapur I on horseback followed by his attendants None Persepolis is built on an enormous artificial platform. At the top of the grand staircase in the middle is the Gate of All Nations, and the tall columns on the right are of the Apadana. Reliefs on the northern stairway leading to the Apadana, the largest palace at Persepolis, showing delegates of the subject nations of the Achaemenid empire paying tribute to the king Reliefs on the northern stairway leading to the Apadana, the largest palace at Persepolis, showing delegates of the subject nations of the Achaemenid empire paying tribute to the king None

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